Information Management Standards - Valid Value Taxonomy
Share this Session:
  William Brantly   William D. Brantly
Database Analyst
Wells Fargo
 


 

Tuesday, March 18, 2008
03:15 PM - 04:15 PM

Level:  Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate


Valid values come in all shapes and sizes, and I'm sure you've seen your fair share, but there's no need to struggle if you have a plan in place for your users and your developers to satisfy everyone's needs in terms of analytics, consistent reporting, and usage.

This presentation will assist you in this process by covering the following topics:


• Why valid values are needed (design, reporting, understanding)
• Standard definitions for abused valid values (NULL, BLANK, SPACE, NOT APPLICABLE, etc.)
• Recommendation for standard usage of these values
• Example of valid value lifecycle (source to target)
• Methods of capturing valid values (tools, processes)
• Composition of draft policy statements
• Guidelines around the ultimate solution (eliminating this situation at the root)


Since 1999, Bill Brantly has been a Data Architect for Wachovia, specializing in the development of enterprise data models and common language strategies across the corporation using the Zachman Framework and Computer Associates ERWin modeling tool. He is currently involved in the development of a Risk Information Management environment, and he has successfully designed and implemented data models in the areas of contact management, a client grouping system, product repository and financial profiling system.


   
Close Window